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January 16, 2019 

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FALLACY OF MASS APPEAL: The logical fallacy of arguing that something is "correct" or "true" because a majority of the population thinks so. This is commonly used by both advertisers and politicians. Just because something is popular, doesn't mean it's "right." In fact, a cynic might argue that being popular probably makes it "wrong."

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Exchange
  • What It Is
  • Equilibrium
  • Competition
  • Number
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: The Numbers
  • Schedule
  • Market Agreement
  • Equilibrium
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: A Graph
  • The Curves
  • The Equilibrium
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Adjustment
  • Self-Correction
  • Shortage
  • Surplus
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Efficiency
  • What It Is
  • Efficient Markets
  • Too Little Production
  • Too Much Production
  • Inefficiency
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Market

    In this lesson, we'll see how buyers (discussed in the demand lesson) come together with sellers (discussed in the supply lesson) to exchange commodities using a market. More precisely, this lesson develops an abstract market model, or market analysis, that we can use to explain and understand a wide range of real world exchanges.

    • This lesson begins with an overview of the basic exchange process underlying markets, including the notion of equilibrium, the roles played by price and quantity, and the importance of competition.
    • In the second unit we work through a simple market analysis using demand and supply schedules, highlight both equilibrium and disequilibrium conditions.
    • The third unit then carefully examines the notion of market equilibrium using demand and supply curves, which generates the widely used graphical model of the market.
    • Moving onto the fourth unit, we use the graphical market model to investigate the automatic market responses to shortages and surpluses.
    • The lesson concludes in the fifth unit by considering the relation between market exchanges and efficiency.

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    AVERAGE REVENUE, MONOPOLY

    The revenue received for selling a good per unit of output sold, found by dividing total revenue by the quantity of output. Average revenue often goes by a simpler and more widely used term... price. For a monopoly average revenue is greater than marginal revenue. Average revenue for a monopoly is often depicted by a negatively-sloped average revenue curve.

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    RED AGGRESSERINE
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a garage sale wanting to buy either a small palm tree that will fit on your coffee table or several magazines on fashion design. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
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    This isn't me! What am I?

    The 1909 Lincoln penny was the first U.S. coin with the likeness of a U.S. President.
    "Good humor is a tonic for mind and body. It is the best antidote for anxiety and depression. It is a business asset. It attracts and keeps friends. It lightens human burdens. It is the direct route to serenity and contentment."

    -- Grenville Kleiser, Author

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