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VERTICAL INTEGRATION: The situation in which a firm participates in more than one successive stage of the production or distribution process. For example a soft drink company that also controls a sugar-producing firm is said to be vertically integrated because the soft drink company does not have to buy sugar from other firms to produce soft drinks. In some cases, two separate firms are vertically integrate because one firm produces a good or service and the other distributes it.

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AE LINE: Another term for aggregate expenditure line, which is a line representing the relation between aggregate expenditures and gross domestic product used in the Keynesian cross. The aggregate expenditure line is obtained by adding investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line. As such, the slope of the aggregate expenditure line is largely based on the slope of the consumption line (which is the marginal propensity to consume), with adjustments coming from the marginal propensity to invest, the marginal propensity for government purchases, and the marginal propensity to import. The intersection of the aggregate expenditures line and the 45-degree line identifies the equilibrium level of output in the Keynesian cross.

     See also | aggregate expenditures | gross domestic product | Keynesian cross | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | consumption line | marginal propensity to consume | marginal propensity to invest | marginal propensity for government purchases | marginal propensity to import | 45-degree line | Keynesian economics | aggregate demand |


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FIXED EXCHANGE RATE

An exchange rate that is established at a specific level and maintained through government actions (usually through monetary policy actions of a central bank). To fix an exchange rate, a government must be willing to buy and sell currency in the foreign exchange market in whatever amounts are necessary to keep the exchange rate fixed. A fixed exchange rate typically disrupts the balance of trade and balance of payments for a country. But in many cases, this is exactly what a country is seeking to do. This is one of three basic exchange rate policies used by domestic governments. The other two policies are flexible exchange rate and managed flexible exchange rate.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market trying to buy either several magazines on computer software or a T-shirt commemorating the second moon landing. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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