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REAL: The value after adjusting for inflation. Pointy-headed economist are frequently interested in comparing stuff (production, income, or whatever) in one year with similar stuff in another year. However, in that inflation can distort such a comparison, it's best made using a fixed set of prices that eliminate inflationary changes. In practice, this is accomplished by using the prices in an arbitrary "base year." Once the price differences have been eliminated, the numbers are said to be measured in real dollars.

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AGGREGATE MARKET SHOCKS: Disruptions of the equilibrium in the aggregate market (or AS-AD model) caused by shifts of the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, or long-run aggregate supply curves. Shocks of the aggregate market are associated with, and thus used to analyze, assorted macroeconomic phenomena such as business cycles, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and economic growth. The specific analysis of aggregate market shocks identifies changes in the price level (GDP price deflator) and real production (real GDP). However, changes in the price level and real production have direct implications for the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, national income, and a host of other macroeconomic measures.

     See also | equilibrium | aggregate market | aggregate demand | short-run aggregate supply | long-run aggregate supply | macroeconomics | phenomenon | business cycles | unemployment | inflation | stabilization policies | economic growth | price level | real production | unemployment rate | inflation rate | national income |


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LAW OF DEMAND

The inverse relationship between demand price and the quantity demanded, assuming ceteris paribus factors are held constant. This fundamental economic principle indicates that a decrease the price of a commodity results in an increase in the quantity of the commodity that buyers are willing and able to purchase in a given period of time, if other factors are held constant. The law of demand is one of the most important principles found in the study of economics.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center wanting to buy either a large stuffed brown and white teddy bear or a replacement washer for your kitchen faucet. Be on the lookout for small children selling products door-to-door.
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