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October 19, 2018 

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GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY: The mobility, or movement, of factors of production from a productive activity in one location to a productive activity in another location. In particular, geographic mobility is the ease with which resources can change locations. For example, a worker leaves a job in one city and takes a job in another city. Some factors are highly mobile and thus are easily moved between cities, states, and even countries. Other factors are highly immobile and not easily relocated. You might want to compare geographic mobility with occupation mobility, the movement of factors from one type of productive activity to another type of productive activity.

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BUYERS' INCOME, DEMAND DETERMINANT: The income that buyers have available to purchase a good, which is assumed constant when a demand curve is constructed. Buyers' income is one of five demand determinants that shift the demand curve when they change. The other four are buyers' preferences, other prices, buyers' expectations, and number of buyers.

     See also | demand determinants | buyers' preferences, demand determinant | other prices, demand determinant | buyers' expectations, demand determinant | number of buyers, demand determinant | normal good | inferior good | supply determinants | demand | market demand | demand price | quantity demanded | law of demand | demand curve | change in demand | change in quantity demanded | ceteris paribus | Marshallian cross | comparative statics | competition | competitive market | market | consumer surplus |


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BUYERS' INCOME, DEMAND DETERMINANT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: October 19, 2018].


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INFLATIONARY GAP, KEYNESIAN MODEL

The difference between equilibrium aggregate production achieved in the Keynesian model and full-employment aggregate production that occurs when equilibrium aggregate production is greater than full-employment aggregate production. An inflationary gap, also termed an expansionary gap, is associated with a business-cycle expansion. The prescribed Keynesian remedy for an inflationary gap is contractionary fiscal policy. This is one of two alternative output gaps that can occur when equilibrium generates production that differs from full employment. The other is a recessionary gap.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites looking to buy either a birthday greeting card for your aunt or a wall poster commemorating the moon landing. Be on the lookout for neighborhood pets, especially belligerent parrots.
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