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July 23, 2019 

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L: This has two common uses. One is as the standard abbreviation for the quantity of labor, especially for the analysis of production. The complementary representations for other inputs are "K" for capital and "N" for population. The second is as the broadest monetary aggregate for the U.S. economy tracked by the Federal Reserve System, best thought of as total liquid assets. It was since be discontinued. In it's heyday, it was comprised of everything in M3 plus other liquid assets, including U.S. Treasury bills, commercial paper, and savings bonds. L was typically 15 to percent higher than M3 and seven times as much as M1. The Federal Reserve System discontinued this measurement in 1998.

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DEMERIT GOOD: A good that society, usually government, deems is overvalued by consumers in normal market exchanges. As such, governments typically restrict the consumption of demerit goods through policies such as taxes or direct government control. Demerit goods are often have characteristics of quasi-public goods or externality by-products. Examples include tobacco and narcotic drugs. The counter type of good is a merit good.

     See also | good | good types | externalities | near-public good | quasi-public good | by-product | government functions | merit good | voluntary exchange |


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KEYNESIAN CROSS

A diagram illustrating the basic Keynesian theory of macroeconomics, with aggregate expenditures measured on the vertical axis and aggregate production measured on the horizontal axis, with the relation between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production represented by a positively-sloped aggregate expenditures line. The "cross" aspect of this diagram is the intersection between the aggregate expenditures line and a 45-degree line indicating every point of equality between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production. The "Keynesian" aspect of this diagram is derived from John Maynard Keynes, the developer and namesake of Keynesian economics.

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APLS

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center hoping to buy either a box of multi-colored, plastic paper clips or several orange mixing bowls. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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This isn't me! What am I?

Cyrus McCormick not only invented the reaper for harvesting grain, he also invented the installment payment for selling his reaper.
"The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet."

-- Aristotle, philosopher

LCH
Life Cycle Hypothesis
A PEDestrian's Guide
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