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CHANGE IN BUSINESS INVENTORIES: The increase or decrease in the stocks of final goods, intermediate goods, raw materials, and other inputs that businesses keep on hand to use in production. This is one of two main categories of gross private domestic investment included in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The other category is fixed investment. Change in business inventories is NOT what most people think of when the topic of business investment arises. Inventory changes are considered investment because firms need inventories to smooth the flow of production and sales just like they need factories and equipment to produce goods. In fact, inventories are frequently termed "working capital."

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ENTRY BARRIERS: Institutional, government, technological, or economic restrictions on the entry of firms into a market or industry. The four primary barriers to entry are: resource ownership, patents and copyrights, government restrictions, and start-up costs. Barriers to entry are a key reason for market control and the inefficiency that this generates. In particular, monopoly, oligopoly, monopsony, and oligopsony often owe their market control to assorted barriers to entry. By way of contrast, perfect competition, monopolistic competition, and monopsonistic competition have few if any barriers to entry and thus little or no market control.

     See also | institution | government | technology | firm | market | market control | inefficiency | monopoly | monopsony | oligopsony | perfect competition | monopolistic competition | monopsonistic competition |


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ENTRY BARRIERS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: January 22, 2018].


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CIRCULAR FLOW

A model of the continuous movement of production, income, and the services of scarce resources that flow between producers and consumers. In particular, the circular flow is a model of the continuous production and consumption interaction among the four major sectors of the macroeconomy--household, business, government, and foreign--using the three macroeconomic markets--product, resource, and financial. The circular flow model provides a easy way of getting the "big picture" and of seeing how the key parts of the macroeconomy fit together.

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