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April 20, 2018 

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EFFICIENT SEARCH, DETERMINANTS: Two factors that affect information search are (1) the amount of purchase and (2) frequency of purchase. Goods that are relatively expensive increase the potential benefit of search. For example, saving 10 percent on the purchase price of a house is significantly more than saving 10 percent on the price of bar of soap. Buyers are thus likely to undertake extensive search when buying a house, but not for soap. Goods that are purchased more frequently also don't require extensive search activities. Since buyers already know the "best places" to buy the "highest quality" products at the "lowest prices" for frequently purchased goods, little can be gained from search.

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FACE VALUE: The stated, or face, value of a legal claim or financial asset. For debt securities, such as corporate bonds or U. S. Treasury securities, this is amount to be repaid at the time of maturity. For equity securities, that is, corporate stocks, this is the initial value set up at the time it is issued. Face value, also called par value, is not necessarily, and often is not, equal to the current market price of the asset. A $10,000 U.S. Treasury note, for example, has a face value of $10,000, but might have a current market price of $9,950. The difference between face value and current price contributes to the yield or return on such assets. An asset is selling at a discount if the current price is less than the face value and is selling at a premium if the current price is more than the par value.

     See also | legal claim | financial asset | corporate bond | Treasury security | corporate stock | maturity | yield | discount | premium | yield to maturity | coupon rate | current yield | present value |


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FACE VALUE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 20, 2018].


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IMPORTS LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between imports bought from the foreign sector and the domestic economy's aggregate level of income or production. This relation is most important for deriving the net exports line, which plays a minor, but growing role in the study of Keynesian economics. An imports line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous imports, and slope, which is the marginal propensity to import and indicates induced imports. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking the net exports line, derived as the difference between the exports line and imports line, onto the consumption line, after adding investment expenditures and government purchases.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through the yellow pages trying to buy either a velvet painting of Elvis Presley or a wall poster commemorating yesterday. Be on the lookout for vindictive digital clocks with revenge on their minds.
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John Maynard Keynes was born the same year Karl Marx died.
"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."

-- Leslie Poles Hartley, Writer

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Panel Study of Income Dynamics
A PEDestrian's Guide
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