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September 19, 2018 

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MARGINAL UTILITY: The additional utility, or satisfaction of wants and needs, obtained from the consumption or use of an additional unit of a good. It is specified as the change in total utility divided by the change in quantity. Marginal utility indicates what each additional unit of a good is worth to a consumer.

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FACTOR MARKET, EFFICIENCY: A factor market achieves efficiency in the allocation of resources by equating marginal revenue product to factor price. Perfect competition, as the efficiency benchmark, is the only market structure to satisfy this criterion and achieve factor market efficiency. Monopsony, oligopsony, and monopsonistic competition are inefficient because they equate marginal revenue product to marginal factor cost, both of which are greater than factor price.

     See also | factor market analysis | perfect competition, factor market analysis | monopsony, factor market analysis | monopoly, factor market analysis | bilateral monopoly, factor market analysis | monopsony, efficiency | factors of production | factor demand | factor supply | production | factor payments | market structures | marginal revenue product | marginal factor cost | efficiency | perfect competition | monopsony | oligopsony | monopsonistic competition | market structures | market control | monopsony, minimum wage | marginal productivity theory | compensating wage differentials | marginal revenue product and factor demand |


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FACTOR MARKET, EFFICIENCY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 19, 2018].


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ASSUMPTIONS, KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS

The macroeconomic study of Keynesian economics relies on three key assumptions--rigid prices, effective demand, and savings-investment determinants. First, rigid or inflexible prices prevent some markets from achieving equilibrium in the short run. Second, effective demand means that consumption expenditures are based on actual income, not full employment or equilibrium income. Lastly, important savings and investment determinants include income, expectations, and other influences beyond the interest rate. These three assumptions imply that the economy can achieve a short-run equilibrium at less than full-employment production.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market trying to buy either a 200-foot blue garden hose or a video camera with stop action features. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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One of the largest markets for gold in the United States is the manufacturing of class rings.
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