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ACTUAL INVESTMENT: Investment expenditures that the business sector actual undertakes during a given time period, including both planned investment and any unplanned inventory changes. This is a critical component of Keynesian economics and the analysis of macroeconomic equilibrium, which occurs when actual investment is equal to planned investment. The difference between planned and actual investment is unplanned investment, which is inventory changes caused by a difference between aggregate expenditures and aggregate output. Should actual and planned investment differ, then aggregate expenditures are not equal to aggregate output, and the macroeconomy is not in equilibrium.

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FINAL GOOD: A good (or service) that is available for purchase by the ultimate or intended user with no plans for further physical transformation or as an input in the production of other goods that will be resold. Gross domestic product seeks to measure the market value of final goods. Final goods are purchased through product markets by the four basic macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) as consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, government purchases, and exports. Final goods, which are closely related to the term current production, should be contrasted with intermediate goods--goods (and services) that will be further processed before reaching their ultimate user.

     See also | good | intermediate good | gross domestic product | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | aggregate expenditures | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports |


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MARGINAL REVENUE CURVE, MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between the marginal revenue received by a monopolistically competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. Because a monopolistically competitive firm is a price maker and faces a negatively-sloped demand curve, its marginal revenue curve is also negatively sloped and lies below its average revenue (and demand) curve. A monopolistically competitive firm maximizes profit by producing the quantity of output found at the intersection of the marginal revenue curve and marginal cost curve.

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Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
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