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VERTICAL INTEGRATION: The situation in which a firm participates in more than one successive stage of the production or distribution process. For example a soft drink company that also controls a sugar-producing firm is said to be vertically integrated because the soft drink company does not have to buy sugar from other firms to produce soft drinks. In some cases, two separate firms are vertically integrate because one firm produces a good or service and the other distributes it.

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KINKED-DEMAND CURVE ANALYSIS: An analysis that seeks to explain rigid oligopolistic prices using the kinked-demand curve. The kinked demand curve contains two distinct segments, one for higher prices that is more elastic and one for lower prices that is less elastic. The corresponding marginal revenue curve contains a vertical segment at the existing or initial quantity. Because a profit-maximizing oligopolistic firm equates marginal cost to marginal revenue, marginal cost also can take on a range of values at the existing quantity. In other words, marginal cost can increase or decrease without inducing a profit-maximizing oligopolistic firm to change price or quantity.

     See also | kinked-demand curve | demand curve | oligopoly | elasticity | quantity demanded | price | marginal revenue | marginal revenue curve | marginal cost | profit maximization |


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AGGREGATE DEMAND CURVE

A graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand (AD) curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the long-run aggregate supply curve and/or the short-run aggregate supply curve. The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate, real-balance, and net-export effects.

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