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NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE: The largest stock market in the United States, located on the famous Wall Street in New York City. This is the big daddy of all stock markets in the country, often referred to as the "big board." It was begun in the 1790s to help fledgling corporations in our fledgling country raise the funds needed for capital investment. All stock transactions (millions each day) are conducted by its members, making membership a very valuable commodity. It currently has slightly over a 1,000 members or "seats," with the only way to get a seat on the exchange from a retiring or deceased member.

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MARGINAL COST: The change in total cost (or total variable cost) resulting from a change in the quantity of output produced by a firm in the short run. Marginal cost indicates how much total cost changes for a give change in the quantity of output. Because changes in total cost are matched by changes in total variable cost in the short run (remember total fixed cost is fixed), marginal cost is the change in either total cost or total variable cost. Marginal cost, usually abbreviated MC, is found by dividing the change in total cost (or total variable cost) by the change in output.

     See also | total cost | total variable cost | marginal cost curve | quantity | law of diminishing marginal returns | technology | resource prices | increasing marginal returns | decreasing marginal returns | U-shaped cost curves | average total cost | average variable cost | average fixed cost | total cost |


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MARGINAL COST, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: May 19, 2022].


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SUPPLY TO A FIRM

The range of quantities of a factor that a firm is able to buy at a range of factor prices. Supply to a firm is a phrase that is most relevant to the study of factor markets, especially when contrasted with supply by a firm. Supply to a firm puts the firm on the buying side of the factor market. Supply by a firm puts the firm on the selling side of the factor market.

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