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April 29, 2017 

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HYSTERESIS: The notion that the natural rate of unemployment is affected by historical events, especially the onset of a business-cycle contraction. Hysteresis results because unemployed resources are permanently changed, through loss of job skills or seniority, making them less employable when the contraction is over. The labor market itself might be permanently change. The result is a permanent increase in structural and frictional unemployment and a higher natural unemployment rate. Alternatively, a prolonged business-cycle expansion can generate long-term changes that cause a permanent decrease in the natural unemployment rate.

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MORAL HAZARD: Moral hazard occurs when a person changes behavior to the detriment of another person, after an agreement has been reached. This is an important information problem with insurance. The problem is that the harmed party does not have information concerning the change in behavior.

     See also | information | insurance | risk | deposit insurance | bank failure | rate of return | government | adverse selection | signalling |


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NO-RESERVE BANKING

A (hypothetical) method of banking in which banks keep 0 percent of their deposits in the form of bank reserves, meaning that ALL deposits are used for interest-paying loans. No-reserve banking is one of two theoretical alternatives designed to help illustrate a contrast to the fractional-reserve banking actually practiced by modern banks. The other alternative is full-reserve banking. With the no-reserve approach a bank operates as financial intermediary or broker, matching up borrowers and lenders.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Real Average Hourly Earnings
November 2016
$10.68
Up $.07 from November 2015

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ORANGE REBELOON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store trying to buy either a rechargeable battery for your computer or shoe laces for your snow boots. Be on the lookout for gnomes hiding in cypress trees.
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Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
"The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet."

-- Aristotle

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