November 28, 2015 

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INCOME DISTRIBUTION: The manner in which income is divided among the members of the economy. A perfectly equal income distribution would mean everyone in the country has exactly the same income. The income distribution in the good old U. S. of A., while more equal than most nations of the world, is far from perfectly equal. A certain amount of inequality in the income distribution is to be expected because resources are never equally distributed. Some labor is naturally going to be more productive--better able to produce the stuff that consumers want--and thus get more income. The same is true for capital, land, entrepreneurship. However, without government intervention, an unequal distribution of income tends to perpetuate itself. Those who have more income, can invest in additional productive resources, and thus can add even more to their income.

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MORAL HAZARD: Moral hazard occurs when a person changes behavior to the detriment of another person, after an agreement has been reached. This is an important information problem with insurance. The problem is that the harmed party does not have information concerning the change in behavior.

     See also | information | insurance | risk | deposit insurance | bank failure | rate of return | government | adverse selection | signalling |

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An elasticity alternative in which relatively large changes in one variable (usually price) cause relatively small changes in another variable (usually quantity). In other words, quantity is not very responsive to price. Quantity does change, but not much, in response to large changes in price. This characterization of elasticity is most important for the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply. Relatively inelastic is one of five elasticity alternatives. The other four are perfectly elastic, perfectly inelastic, relatively elastic, and unit elastic.

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July 2015
$446.5 million
Down 0.6% from June 2015: U.S Census Bureau

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials trying to buy either a package of 3 by 5 index cards, the ones without lines or a blue mechanical pencil. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from former employers.
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