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AGGREGATE SUPPLY: The total (or aggregate) real production of final goods and services available in the domestic economy at a range of price levels, during a given time period. Aggregate supply (AS) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate demand. Aggregate supply, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate supply relation is generally separated into long-run aggregate supply, in which all prices and wages and flexible and all markets are in equilibrium, and short-run aggregate supply, in which some prices and wage are NOT flexible and some markets are NOT in equilibrium.

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SAVING FUNCTION: The positive relation between household saving and household disposable income. The saving function is commonly presented as the saving line or propensity-to-saving line. The slope of this line is the marginal propensity to save, which is the proportion of any additional income used for saving. The saving function and the marginal propensity to saving play key roles in the multiplier and accelerator concepts. Because consumption is the difference between disposable income and saving, the consumption function is a complementary relation to the saving function.

     See also | Keynesian economics | saving | consumption expenditures | disposable income | saving line | multiplier | accelerator | consumption function | marginal propensity to save |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE, MONOPSONY

A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal factor cost incurred by a monopsony for hiring an input and the quantity of input employed. A profit-maximizing monopsony hires the quantity of input found at the intersection of the marginal factor cost curve and marginal revenue product curve. The marginal factor cost curve for a monopsony with market control is positively sloped and lies above the average factor cost curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers seeking to buy either a rechargeable battery for your camera or a coffee cup commemorating the first day of spring. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
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More money is spent on gardening than on any other hobby.
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