Google
Thursday 
August 18, 2022 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
AD CURVE: The aggregate demand curve, which is a graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand, or AD, curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the aggregate supply curve (which is actually two curves, the long-run aggregate supply curve and the short-run aggregate supply curve). The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate effect, real-balance effect, and net-export effect.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

DERIVATION, SAVING LINE: A saving line, a graphical depiction of the relation between household sector saving and income, can be derived from the consumption line. The saving line can also be derived by plotting the saving-income information from a saving schedule or using the slope and intercept values of the saving function. However, derivation from the consumption line emphasis the connection between consumption and income--that the household sector uses a portion of income for consumption and a portion for saving.

     See also | saving schedule | saving line | saving function | induced saving | autonomous saving | average propensity to save | marginal propensity to save | consumption line | derivation, consumption line | slope, saving line | intercept, saving line | effective demand | psychological law | saving | consumption expenditures | Keynesian economics | macroeconomics | household sector | disposable income | national income | personal saving expenditures | induced expenditures | autonomous expenditures | aggregate expenditures | derivation, aggregate expenditures line | aggregate expenditures line | saving expenditures determinants | Keynesian model | Keynesian equilibrium | injections-leakages model | aggregate demand | paradox of thrift | fiscal policy | multiplier |


Recommended Citation:

DERIVATION, SAVING LINE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: August 18, 2022].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: derivation, saving line

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

AVERAGE REVENUE AND MARGINAL REVENUE

A mathematical connection between average revenue and marginal revenue stating that the change in the average revenue depends on a comparison between average revenue and marginal revenue. For perfect competition, with no market control, marginal revenue is equal to average revenue, and average revenue does not change. For monopoly and other firms with market control, marginal revenue is less than average revenue, and average revenue falls.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

BLUE PLACIDOLA
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through mail order catalogs seeking to buy either throw pillows for your living room sofa or a hepa filter for your furnace. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The first U.S. fire insurance company was established by Benjamin Franklin in 1752 in Philadelphia.
"Our vision controls the way we think and, therefore, the way we act . . . The vision we have of our jobs determines what we do and the opportunities we see or don't see. "

-- Charles Koch, executive

PDV
Present Discounted Value
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2022 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster