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July 23, 2024 

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SHERMAN ACT: The first antitrust law passed in the United States in 1890 that outlawed monopoly or any attempts to monopolize a market. This was one of three major antitrust laws passed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The other two were the Clayton Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act. The Sherman Act was successfully used to break up several noted monopolies in the early 1900s, including the Standard Oil Trust in 1911. However, it was flawed by (1) vague wording that allowed wide interpretation (especially based on political influence) and (2) the lack of an effective means of enforcement other than an extended journey through the court system. These two flaws led to the Federal Trade Commission Act and Clayton Act, both passed in 1914. Although other laws have been passed, the Sherman Act remains the cornerstone of antitrust laws in the United States.

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INDUCED GOVERNMENT PURCHASES

Government purchases that depend on income or production (especially national income and gross domestic product). That is, changes in income induce changes in government purchases. Induced government purchases reflect the observation that the government sector (especially state and local governments) is inclined to use tax revenue, which increases with income, for purchases. They are measured by the marginal propensity for government purchases (MPG) and are reflected by the positive slope of government purchases line. The alternative to induced government purchases is autonomous government purchases, which do not depend on income.

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Fact 5: Our Necessary Evil

It's time to give up our attempts to enter the Merciless Monolithic Media Masters Cable Television Company, Inc. office and take care of other pressing business -- taxes. The next stop on our excursion through the economy is the Shady Valley City Hall, where we need to momentarily, and begrudgingly, pause so that I may pay my semi-annual property tax bill. This is the least enjoyable stop -- at least for me -- on our journey. Grumble. Grumble. Grumble.

Of course I hate to pay taxes! But, then again, who doesn't? Taxes are one of those annoying and evil necessities of life that simply can't be avoided.

Or can they? Do we have to pay taxes? A quick visit to a bookstore will produce dozens of books telling you how to avoid taxes by investing here or buying this or doing that. Better yet, if we could rid ourselves of the inefficient, bloated, incompetent, do-nothing government, then you and I wouldn't have to pay taxes. Right? We could use our hard-earned income to buy stuff that we want, rather than letting the inefficient, bloated, incompetent, do-nothing government spend it on stuff that we don't want, don't know anything about, and will never need. Right?
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BEIGE MUNDORTLE
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall hoping to buy either a coffee cup commemorating the first day of spring or a printer that works with your stockpile of ink cartridges. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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The first U.S. fire insurance company was established by Benjamin Franklin in 1752 in Philadelphia.
"The greatest use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it."

-- William James, psychologist

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