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May 26, 2022 

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QUASI-PUBLIC: A good or activity that is some, but not all characteristics of a public good or activity. The term quasi-public is often used in connection with business activities that are privately controlled, but which are authorized by government legislation. The Federal National Mortgage Association is one example. Quasi-public is also commonly used in reference to goods that have one but not both of the key characteristics of a public good--nonrival consumption or nonexcludability of nonpayers. Information are transportation examples of quasi-public goods in which nonpayers can be excluded from use (like a private good) but are nonrival in consumption (like a public good).

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CAPITAL GAINS TAX: A tax on the difference between the sales price of a "capital" asset and it's original purchase price. The capital assets subject to this tax include such things real estate, stocks, and bonds. This tax is frequently a source of controversy between the second and third estates. In that the second estate owns and sells a lot of this sort of capital, they don't like to pay taxes on capital gains. However, because the third estate doesn't have much capital it seems like a pretty good thing to tax. Those who oppose the capital gains tax argue that it takes away funds that would be used for further capital investment, which thus inhibits economic growth. Those who favor it argue that helps equalize unfairly unequal income and wealth distributions.

     See also | capital | asset | corporate stock | bond | second estate | third estate | investment | economic growth | income distribution | wealth distribution | corporate income tax | progressive tax |


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DISPOSABLE INCOME AND PERSONAL INCOME

Disposable income (DI) is the total income that can be used by the household sector for either consumption or saving during a given period of time, usually one year. Personal income (PI) is the total income received by the members of the domestic household sector, which may or may not be earned from productive activities during a given period of time, usually one year. Disposable income is after-tax income that is officially calculated as the difference between personal income and personal tax and nontax payments. In the numbers game, personal tax and nontax payments are about 15 percent of personal income, which makes disposable personal income about 85 percent of personal income.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store looking to buy either a flower arrangement in a coffee cup for your father or a how-to book on meeting people. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice in Wonderland, was the pseudonym of Charles Dodgson, an accomplished mathematician and economist.
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