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FACTOR DEMAND DETERMINANTS: The three most important determinants that shift the factor demand curve are: (1) product price, (2) factor productivity, and (3) prices of other factors. Like any determinant, these three cause the factor demand curve to shift to a new location. An increase in factor demand is a rightward shift of the factor demand curve and a decrease in factor demand is a leftward shift.

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MARGINAL COST AND MARGINAL PRODUCT: Because variable cost is largely associated with the cost of employing a variable input in the short run, it's possible to identify a connection between the marginal cost curve and the marginal product curve. In particular, the quantity of output in which marginal cost is at a minimum, is the same quantity of output produced by the variable input when the marginal product of the variable input is at a maximum. In addition, over the range of production in which the variable input experiences increasing marginal returns and marginal product increases, the marginal cost curve declines. And over the range of production in which the variable input experiences decreasing marginal returns brought on by the law of diminishing marginal returns and marginal product increases, the marginal cost curve is rising.

     See also | marginal cost | marginal product | law of diminishing marginal returns | variable input | variable cost | fixed input | fixed cost | marginal cost curve | marginal product curve |


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MARGINAL COST AND MARGINAL PRODUCT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 25, 2018].


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IMPERFECT COMPETITION

Markets or industries with two or more sellers and buyers that fail to match the criteria of perfect competition. The most noted examples of imperfect competition are the two market structures with selling-side control--monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Lesser known market structures with buying-side control--monopsonistic competition and oligopsony--are also considered as imperfect competition. Facing no competition, monopoly and monopsony are not included. Most real world markets can be considered imperfect competition.

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