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April 22, 2018 

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CLOSED SHOP: An employment arrangement, usually written into a collective bargaining agreement, in which a firm is allowed to hire only labor union members. Because this gives a labor union complete control over the labor services supplied to a particular firm, it was one of the earliest methods used by labor unions to monopolized a labor market. However, closed shops were outlawed by the Taft-Hartley Act passed in 1947 and has been largely supplanted by union shops.

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MARGINAL PRODUCT CURVE: A curve that graphically illustrates the relation between marginal product and the quantity of the variable input, holding all other inputs fixed. This curve indicates the incremental change in output at each level of the variable input. The marginal product curve is one of three related curves used in the analysis of the short-run production of a firm. The other two are total product curve and average product curve. The marginal product curve plays in key role in the economic analysis of short-run production by a firm in large part because economists are generally obsessed with marginal changes in production.

     See also | marginal product | curve | total product | output | input | variable input | fixed input | average product | marginal cost | law of diminishing marginal returns | average-marginal rule | total-marginal rule | short-run production |


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MANAGED FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATE

An exchange rate control policy in which an exchange rate that is generally allowed to adjust to equilibrium levels through to the interaction of supply and demand in the foreign exchange market, but with occasional intervention by government. Also termed managed float or dirty float, most nations of the world currently use a managed flexible exchange rate policy. With this alternative an exchange rate is free to rise and fall, but it is subject to government control if it moves too high or too low. With managed float, the government steps into the foreign exchange market and buys or sells whatever currency is necessary keep the exchange rate within desired limits. This is one of three basic exchange rate policies used by domestic governments. The other two policies are flexible exchange rate and fixed exchange rate.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area trying to buy either a revolving spice rack or a how-to book on home repairs. Be on the lookout for the last item on a shelf.
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The word "fiscal" is derived from a Latin word meaning "moneybag."
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-- C. Northcote Parkinson, historian

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