Google
Monday 
January 24, 2022 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
MARKET SHARE: The fraction of an industry's total sales accounted for by a single business. In general, market share is a "first-guess" indicator of a firm's market control. If, for example, a company has a market share of 100 percent (that is, a monopoly), then you can rest assured it has a substantial amount of market control. A company with a 25 percent market share has less, but still notable, market control. In fact, when you get right down to the bottom line, the phrase "market share" is only worth mentioning for oligopolistic firms with a significant degree of market control. There really is no market control for a monopolistically competitive firm with a 0.00000001 percent market share.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

MERGER: The consolidation of two separately-owned businesses under single ownership. This can be accomplished through a mutual, "friendly" agreement by both parties, or through a "hostile takeover," in which one business gets ownership without cooperation from the other. Mergers fall into one of three classes -- (1) horizontal--two competing firms in the same industry that sell the same products, (2) vertical--two firms in different stages of the production of one good, such that the output of one business is the input of the other, and (3) conglomerate--two firms that are in totally, completely separated industries.

     See also | oligopoly | market structure | collusion | horizontal merger | vertical merger | conglomerate merger | antitrust laws | cartel | monopoly | competition |


Recommended Citation:

MERGER, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 24, 2022].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: merger

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

INTEREST RATES, AGGREGATE DEMAND DETERMINANT

One of several specific aggregate demand determinants assumed constant when the aggregate demand curve is constructed, and that shifts the aggregate demand curve when it changes. An increase in interest rates cause a decrease (leftward shift) of the aggregate curve. A decrease in interest rates an increase (rightward shift) of the aggregate curve. Other notable aggregate demand determinants include the federal deficit, inflationary expectations, and the money supply.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

GREEN LOGIGUIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center wanting to buy either a large stuffed brown and white teddy bear or a replacement washer for your kitchen faucet. Be on the lookout for small children selling products door-to-door.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The earliest known use of paper currency was about 1270 in China during the rule of Kubla Khan.
"Wherever you go, no matter what the weather, always bring your own sunshine."

-- Anthony J. D'Angelo

MSCI
Morgan Stanley Capital Index
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2022 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster