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September 20, 2018 

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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS: A school of thought developed by John Maynard Keynes built on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business cycle instability, especially recessions. The basic structure of Keynesian economics was initially presented in Keynes' book The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, published in 1936. For the next forty years, the Keynesian school dominated the economics discipline and reached a pinnacle as a guide for federal government policy in the 1960s. It fell out of favor in the 1970s and 1980s, as monetarism, neoclassical economics, supply-side economics, and rational expectations became more widely accepted, but it still has a strong following in the academic and policy-making arenas.

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REALISM OF MONOPOLY: If taken to the extreme, monopoly, like perfect competition is an ideal market structure that does not actually exist in the real world. In the extreme, a "pure" monopoly is a market containing one and only ONE seller of good, a good with absolutely, positively no substitutes. The product is absolutely, certifiably unique. It's not just that it has no CLOSE substitutes, it has NO substitutes. Period. End of story. In the real world, however, every product, no matter how seemingly unique it might appear, has substitutes. The substitutes might not be very close. They might be really, really bad substitutes. But they are substitutes. As such, there are no pure monopolies in the real world.

     See also | monopoly | monopoly characteristics | perfect competition | market control | substitute | natural monopoly | market | imperfect competition | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | price maker | price taker |


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REALISM OF MONOPOLY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 20, 2018].


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MARGINAL BENEFIT OF SEARCH

The incremental benefit generated by additional search effort is the marginal benefit of search. Marginal benefit of search, also termed marginal search benefit, is comparable to marginal revenue of short-run production analysis and marginal utility of consumer demand theory. Marginal benefit of search decreases with an increase in search effort and is represented by the marginal benefit of search curve. This is one half of the efficient information search decision. The other is marginal cost of search.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling through a department store hoping to buy either several magazines on fashion design or a package of 3 by 5 index cards, the ones without lines. Be on the lookout for neighborhood pets, especially belligerent parrots.
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Three-forths of the gold mined each year is used to manufacture jewelry.
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