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October 19, 2018 

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SHERMAN ACT: The first antitrust law passed in the United States in 1890 that outlawed monopoly or any attempts to monopolize a market. This was one of three major antitrust laws passed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The other two were the Clayton Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act. The Sherman Act was successfully used to break up several noted monopolies in the early 1900s, including the Standard Oil Trust in 1911. However, it was flawed by (1) vague wording that allowed wide interpretation (especially based on political influence) and (2) the lack of an effective means of enforcement other than an extended journey through the court system. These two flaws led to the Federal Trade Commission Act and Clayton Act, both passed in 1914. Although other laws have been passed, the Sherman Act remains the cornerstone of antitrust laws in the United States.

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INELASTIC DEMAND:

The general elasticity relation in which relatively large changes in price cause relatively small changes in quantity demanded. Large changes in price cause relatively small changes in quantity demanded or the percentage change in quantity demanded is smaller than the percentage change in price. This characterization of elasticity is most important for the price elasticity of demand. Inelastic demand is one of two general elasticity relations for demand. The other is elastic demand.
An inelastic demand relation is NOT a very responsive, or stretchable, relation. The inelastic demand relation is most often directed toward demand in terms of the price elasticity of demand. In this context, demand is said to be inelastic if the percentage change in quantity is smaller than the percentage change in price. This means that buyers are not responsive to price changes.

An inelastic demand relation can fall into one of two categories--perfectly inelastic and relatively inelastic.

  • Perfectly Inelastic: Perfectly inelastic means that quantity demanded is unaffected by any change in price. In other words, the quantity is essentially fixed. It does not matter how much price changes, quantity does not budge. Perfectly inelastic demand occurs when buyers have no choice in the consumption of a good.

  • Relatively Inelastic: Relatively inelastic means that relatively large changes in price cause relatively small changes in quantity. In other words, quantity is not very responsive to price, but it does change. More specifically, the percentage change in quantity demanded is less than the percentage change in price. Relatively inelastic demand occurs when buyers are only able to choose among a small number of imperfect substitutes-in-consumption.

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Recommended Citation:

INELASTIC DEMAND, AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: October 19, 2018].


Check Out These Related Terms...

     | inelastic supply | inelastic | elastic | elastic supply | elastic demand | perfectly elastic | perfectly inelastic | relatively elastic | relatively inelastic | unit elastic | elasticity alternatives | elasticity alternatives, demand | elasticity alternatives, supply |


Or For A Little Background...

     | elasticity | coefficient of elasticity | price elasticity of demand | demand | law of demand | demand curve |


And For Further Study...

     | elasticity and demand slope | elasticity and supply intercept | demand elasticity and total expenditure | price elasticity of supply | income elasticity of demand | cross elasticity of demand | elasticity determinants |


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