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January 19, 2018 

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A: The common notation for the "intercept" term of an equation specified as Y = a + bX. Mathematically, the a-intercept term indicates the value of the Y variable when the value of the X variable is equal to zero. Theoretically, the a-intercept is frequently used to indicate exogenous or independent influences on the Y variable, that is, influences that are independent of the X variable. For example, if Y represents consumption and X represents national income, a measures autonomous consumption expenditures.

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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE LINE: A line representing the relation between aggregate expenditures and gross domestic product used in the Keynesian cross. The aggregate expenditure line is obtained by adding investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line. As such, the slope of the aggregate expenditure line is largely based on the slope of the consumption line (which is the marginal propensity to consume), with adjustments coming from the marginal propensity to invest, the marginal propensity for government purchases, and the marginal propensity to import. The intersection of the aggregate expenditures line and the 45-degree line identifies the equilibrium level of output in the Keynesian cross.

     See also | aggregate expenditures | gross domestic product | Keynesian cross | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | consumption line | marginal propensity to consume | marginal propensity to invest | marginal propensity for government purchases | marginal propensity to import | 45-degree line | Keynesian economics | aggregate demand |


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LONG-RUN MARGINAL COST

The change in the long-run total cost of producing a good or service resulting from a change in the quantity of output produced. Like all marginals, long-run marginal cost is an increment of the corresponding total. It is the change in long-run total cost divided by, or resulting from, a change in quantity. Long-run marginal cost is guided by returns to scale rather than marginal returns.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center looking to buy either a computer that can play music and burn CDs or a T-shirt commemorating last Friday (you know why). Be on the lookout for attractive cable television service repair people.
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The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
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