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July 20, 2018 

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REGRESSIVE TAX: A tax in which people with more income pay a smaller percentage in taxes. A regressive tax is given by this example--You earn $10,000 a year and your boss gets $20,000. You pay $2,000 in taxes (20 percent) while your boss also pays $2,000 in taxes (10 percent). Examples of regressive taxes abound (is this surprising given the political clout of the wealthy?), including sales tax, excise tax, and Social Security tax.

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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE LINE: A line representing the relation between aggregate expenditures and gross domestic product used in the Keynesian cross. The aggregate expenditure line is obtained by adding investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line. As such, the slope of the aggregate expenditure line is largely based on the slope of the consumption line (which is the marginal propensity to consume), with adjustments coming from the marginal propensity to invest, the marginal propensity for government purchases, and the marginal propensity to import. The intersection of the aggregate expenditures line and the 45-degree line identifies the equilibrium level of output in the Keynesian cross.

     See also | aggregate expenditures | gross domestic product | Keynesian cross | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | consumption line | marginal propensity to consume | marginal propensity to invest | marginal propensity for government purchases | marginal propensity to import | 45-degree line | Keynesian economics | aggregate demand |


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE LINE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: July 20, 2018].


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PRIVATE GOODS

Goods characterized by rival consumption and the ability to exclude nonpayers. Private goods are one of four types of goods differentiated by consumption rivalry and nonpayer excludability. The other three goods are public (nonrival consumption and nonpayers cannot be excluded), common-property (rival consumption and nonpayers cannot be excluded), and near-public (nonrival consumption and nonpayers can be excluded). Rival consumption and the ease of excluding of nonpayers means private goods can be efficiently exchanged through markets.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market wanting to buy either a revolving spice rack or a how-to book on home repairs. Be on the lookout for spoiled cheese hiding under your bed hatching conspiracies against humanity.
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Mark Twain said "I wonder how much it would take to buy soap buble if there was only one in the world."
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