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CHANGE IN SUPPLY: A shift of the supply curve caused by a change in one of the supply determinants. In essence, a change in supply is caused by any factor affecting supply EXCEPT price. This concept should be contrasted directly with a change in quantity supplied. You should also review the terms change in quantity demanded and change in demand, too. A change in supply is a change in ALL supply price-quantity supplied pairs, meaning that each price is matched up with a different quantity (which is illustrated as a shift of the supply curve). And this change in supply is caused by a change in any of the supply determinants. In contrast, a change in quantity supplied is a change from one price-quantity pair to the another (which is illustrated as a movement along a given supply curve).

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CAPITAL DEPRECIATION: The wearing out, breaking down, or technological obsolescence of physical capital that results from use in the production of goods and services. To paraphrase an old saying, "You can't make a car without breaking a few socket wrenches." In other words, when capital is used over and over again to produce goods and services, it wears down from such use.

     See also | capital consumption adjustment | net national product | national income | personal income | disposable income | gross national product | real gross domestic product | net domestic product | gross domestic product | production | gross private domestic investment | net private domestic investment | capital | investment | investment expenditures | National Income and Product Accounts | Bureau of Economic Analysis | National Bureau of Economic Research | macroeconomic problems | macroeconomic theories | macroeconomic sectors | circular flow | business cycles | stabilization policies | gross domestic product, ins and outs | gross domestic product, expenditures | gross domestic product, income | net foreign factor income |


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CAPITAL DEPRECIATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: September 17, 2019].


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IMPORTS LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between imports bought from the foreign sector and the domestic economy's aggregate level of income or production. This relation is most important for deriving the net exports line, which plays a minor, but growing role in the study of Keynesian economics. An imports line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous imports, and slope, which is the marginal propensity to import and indicates induced imports. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking the net exports line, derived as the difference between the exports line and imports line, onto the consumption line, after adding investment expenditures and government purchases.

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The word "fiscal" is derived from a Latin word meaning "moneybag."
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