Google
Sunday 
November 17, 2019 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
ACCOUNTING PROFIT: The difference between a business's revenue and it's accounting expenses. This is the profit that's listed on a company's balance sheet, appears periodically in the financial sector of the newspaper, and is reported to the Internal Revenue Service for tax purposes. It frequently has little relationship to a company's economic profit because of the difference between accounting expense and the opportunity cost of production. Some accounting expense is not an opportunity cost and some opportunity cost is does not show up as an accounting expenses.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

DEADWEIGHT LOSS: A net loss in social welfare that results because the benefit generated by an action differs from the foregone opportunity cost. This is usually the combination of lost consumer surplus and lost producer surplus, and indicates of the inefficiency of a situation. Deadweight loss is commonly illustrated by a market diagram if the quantity of output produced results in a demand price that exceeds the supply price. The triangle formed by the demand curve above, supply curve below, and quantity to the left is the area of deadweight loss. If demand price equals supply price, this triangle disappears and so too does the deadweight loss. Deadweight loss can result from government actions (taxes, price controls) or from market failures (externalities, market control)

     See also | efficiency | welfare economics | demand price | supply price | inefficiency | market | tax incidence | price ceiling | price floor | externalities | market control |


Recommended Citation:

DEADWEIGHT LOSS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: November 17, 2019].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: deadweight loss

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION RATE

The proportion of the total noninstitutionalized civilian population 16 years of age and over that is in the civilian labor force. The labor force participation rate is essentially the ratio of the civilian labor force to the total noninstitutionalized civilian population 16 years of age and over. The data used to estimated the labor force participation rate is obtained along with other labor force data from the monthly Current Population Survey conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Labor force participation rates are also commonly calculated using data derived from the Census of the Population.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

WHITE GULLIBON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction seeking to buy either hand lotion, a big bottle of hand lotion or a lighted magnifying glass. Be on the lookout for pencil sharpeners with an attitude.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

A thousand years before metal coins were developed, clay tablet "checks" were used as money by the Babylonians.
"Security can only be achieved through constant change, through discarding old ideas that have outlived their usefulness and adapting others to current facts. "

-- William O. Douglas, Supreme Court Justice

FIRA
Foreign Investment Review Agency
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2019 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster