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January 16, 2018 

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MACROECONOMIC MARKETS: Three sets of markets that make up the macroeconomy--product, financial, and resource--which exchange the three primary types of macroeconomic commodities--gross production, legal claims, and factor services. The four macroeconomic sectors--household, business, government, and foreign--interact through these three sets of markets. The primary objective of macroeconomic theories is to explain activity that takes place in these three sets of markets.

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DEADWEIGHT LOSS: A net loss in social welfare that results because the benefit generated by an action differs from the foregone opportunity cost. This is usually the combination of lost consumer surplus and lost producer surplus, and indicates of the inefficiency of a situation. Deadweight loss is commonly illustrated by a market diagram if the quantity of output produced results in a demand price that exceeds the supply price. The triangle formed by the demand curve above, supply curve below, and quantity to the left is the area of deadweight loss. If demand price equals supply price, this triangle disappears and so too does the deadweight loss. Deadweight loss can result from government actions (taxes, price controls) or from market failures (externalities, market control)

     See also | efficiency | welfare economics | demand price | supply price | inefficiency | market | tax incidence | price ceiling | price floor | externalities | market control |


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DEADWEIGHT LOSS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: January 16, 2018].


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SAVING

The after-tax disposable income of the household sector that is not used for consumption expenditures. Saving primarily involves the use of income to purchase legal claims through financial markets rather than the direct purchase of physical goods and services (which is consumption expenditures). In the circular flow model, saving is the diversion of household income away from consumption expenditures and into the financial markets, which then flows to business investment expenditures and government purchases. Saving is one of two basic uses of disposable income. The other is consumption expenditures.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time touring the new suburban shopping complex looking to buy either a set of serrated steak knives, with durable plastic handles or a pair of blue silicon oven mitts. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
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A scripophilist is one who collects rare stock and bond certificates, usually from extinct companies.
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