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January 20, 2022 

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KUZNETS CYCLE: A cycle of economic activity lasting between 15 and 20 years that acquired the name of the first economist to study it, Nobel Prize laureate Simon Kuznets. The Kuznets cycle is attributed to investment in housing and building construction and is well know among professionals in the real estate market. This is one of four separate cycles of macroeconomic activity that have been documented or hypothesized. The other three are Kitchin cycle, Juglar cycle, and Kondratieff cycle.

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EXPLICIT COLLUSION: A formal, usually secret, collusion agreement among competing firms (mostly oligopolistic firms) in an industry designed to control the market, raise the market price, and otherwise act like a monopoly. Also termed overt collusion, the distinguishing feature of explicit collusion is a formal agreement. This should be contrasted with implicit or tacit collusion that does not involve a formal, explicit agreement.

     See also | collusion | oligopoly | industry | market control | price | monopoly | competition among the few | overt collusion | implicit collusion | cartel | antitrust laws |


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MARGINAL PRODUCTIVITY THEORY

A theory used to analyze the profit-maximizing quantity of inputs (that is, the services of factor of productions) purchased by a firm in the production of output. Marginal-productivity theory indicates that the demand for a factor of production is based on the marginal product of the factor. In particular, a firm is generally willing to pay a higher price for an input that is more productive and contributes more to output. The demand for an input is thus best termed a derived demand.

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