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January 16, 2018 

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WILLINGNESS TO PAY: The price or dollar amount that someone is willing to give up or pay to acquire a good or service. Willingness to pay is the source of the demand price of a good. However, unlike demand price, in which buyers are on the spot of actually giving up the payment, willingness to pay does not require an actual payment. This concept is important to benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics, and efficiency criteria, especially Kaldor-Hicks efficiency. A related concept is willingness to accept.

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LONG-RUN INDUSTRY SUPPLY CURVE: The relation between market price and the quantity supplied by all firms in a perfectly competitive industry after the industry as completed its long-run adjustment. The long-run industry supply curve effectively traces out a series of equilibrium prices and quantities the reflect long-run adjustments of a perfectly competitive industry to demand shocks. This long-run adjustment can take one of three paths: increasing, decreasing, and constant. These three adjustment paths indicate an increasing-cost industry, decreasing-cost industry, and constant-cost industry, respectively.

     See also | price | quantity supplied | firm | perfect competition | industry | long-run adjustment, perfect competition | demand shock | increasing-cost industry | decreasing-cost industry | constant-cost industry |


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LONG-RUN INDUSTRY SUPPLY CURVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: January 16, 2018].


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POLITICAL ENTREPRENEURS

Election seeking politicians who undertake risks inherent in the allocation of resources made through government actions. Like business entrepreneurs, political entrepreneurs take risks and organize production. They organize production with government laws, regulations, and policies. They run the risk of failed policies and losing elections. Their utility-maximizing actions are also a prime source of government failure. Falling victim to the principal-agent problem, pursuit of their own satisfaction (winning elections) often conflicts with what is best for the rest of society.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market looking to buy either a wall poster commemorating yesterday or pink cotton balls. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
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Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
"Good humor is a tonic for mind and body. It is the best antidote for anxiety and depression. It is a business asset. It attracts and keeps friends. It lightens human burdens. It is the direct route to serenity and contentment."

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