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September 18, 2018 

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NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE: The largest stock market in the United States, located on the famous Wall Street in New York City. This is the big daddy of all stock markets in the country, often referred to as the "big board." It was begun in the 1790s to help fledgling corporations in our fledgling country raise the funds needed for capital investment. All stock transactions (millions each day) are conducted by its members, making membership a very valuable commodity. It currently has slightly over a 1,000 members or "seats," with the only way to get a seat on the exchange from a retiring or deceased member.

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RESOURCE PRICE, AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANT: One of three categories of aggregate supply determinants assumed constant when the aggregate supply curve is constructed, and which shifts the aggregate supply curve when it changes. An increase in a resource price causes a decrease (leftward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. A decrease in a resource price causes an increase (rightward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. The other two categories of aggregate supply determinants are resource quantity and resource quality. Specific determinants falling into this general category include wages and energy prices. Anything affecting the prices paid for the use of labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship is also included.

     See also | resource quantity, aggregate supply determinant | resource quality, aggregate supply determinant | wages, aggregate supply determinant | energy prices, aggregate supply determinant | aggregate supply determinants | aggregate supply shifts | change in aggregate supply | change in real production | slope, aggregate supply curve | technology, aggregate supply determinant | capital stock, aggregate supply determinant | aggregate demand determinants |


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RESOURCE PRICE, AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 18, 2018].


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ELASTICITY

The relative response of one variable to changes in another variable. Elasticity is commonly used in the study of market exchanges to identify the relative response of quantity (demanded and supplied) to changes in price. The phrase "relative response" is best interpreted as the percentage change, such as, the percentage change in quantity measured against the percentage change in price. The most common notions of elasticity are the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply. Other notable economic elasticities are the income elasticity of demand and the cross elasticity of demand.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway wanting to buy either a case of blank recordable DVDs or a pair of red goulashes with shiny buckles. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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A U.S. dime has 118 groves around its edge, one fewer than a U.S. quarter.
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