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October 1, 2022 

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DISCOUNT RATE: The interest rate that the Federal Reserve System charges for loans to banks. To ensure that our nation's banks retain their liquidity and remain in business, the Federal Reserve System stands ready to lend bank reserves on a moment's notice to any bank. The discount rate is the interest rate the Federal Reserve System charges for these loans. Like any interest rate, when it goes up (or down) it discourages (or encourages) borrowing. In principle, the Fed can use the discount rate to control our nation's money supply.

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TAX MULTIPLIER: The ratio of the change in aggregate output (or gross domestic product) to an autonomous change in a taxes. The tax multiplier is equal to the expenditure multiplier times the marginal propensity to consume. This is based on the only a fraction of the change in disposable income resulting from the change in taxes will result in a change in consumption expenditures. The tax multiplier can be used to indicate the change in fiscal policy induced government taxes are needed to achieve a given level of aggregate output (presumably full-employment output).

     See also | multiplier | Keynesian economics | macroeconomics | aggregate output | aggregate expenditures | autonomous change | marginal propensity to consume | induced expenditure | fiscal policy | full-employment output | tax multiplier | simple expenditure multiplier | balanced-budget multiplier |


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TAX MULTIPLIER, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: October 1, 2022].


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CONCENTRATION RATIOS

A family of measures of the proportion of total output in an industry that is produced by a given number of the largest firms in the industry. The two most common concentration ratios are for the four largest firms and the eight largest firms. The four-firm concentration ratio is the proportion of total output produced by the four largest firms in the industry and the eight-firm concentration ratio is proportion of total output produced by the eight largest firms in the industry. Concentration ratios are commonly used to indicate the degree to which an industry is oligopolistic and the extent of market control of the largest firms in the industry. A related measure is the Herfindahl index.

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