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CAPITAL ACCOUNT: One of two parts of a nation's balance of payments. The capital is a record of all purchases of physical and financial assets between a nation and the rest of the world in a given period, usually one year. On one side of the balance of payments ledger account are all of the foreign assets purchase by our domestic economy. On the other side of the ledger are all of our domestic assets purchased by foreign countries. The capital account is said to have a surplus if a nation's investments abroad are greater than foreign investments at home. In other words, if the good old U. S. of A. is buying up more assets in Mexico, Brazil, and Hungry, than Japanese, Germany, and Canada investors are buying up of good old U. S. assets, then we have a surplus. A deficit is the reverse.

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TAX MULTIPLIER: The ratio of the change in aggregate output (or gross domestic product) to an autonomous change in a taxes. The tax multiplier is equal to the expenditure multiplier times the marginal propensity to consume. This is based on the only a fraction of the change in disposable income resulting from the change in taxes will result in a change in consumption expenditures. The tax multiplier can be used to indicate the change in fiscal policy induced government taxes are needed to achieve a given level of aggregate output (presumably full-employment output).

     See also | multiplier | Keynesian economics | macroeconomics | aggregate output | aggregate expenditures | autonomous change | marginal propensity to consume | induced expenditure | fiscal policy | full-employment output | tax multiplier | simple expenditure multiplier | balanced-budget multiplier |


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TAX MULTIPLIER, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: August 23, 2019].


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INTERMEDIATE GOODS

Goods (and services) that are used as inputs or components in the production of other goods. Intermediate goods are combined into the production of finished products, or what are termed final goods. Unlike final goods, intermediate goods will be further processed before sold as final goods. Because gross domestic product seeks to measure the market value of final goods, and because the value of intermediate goods are included in the value of final goods, market transactions that capture the value of intermediate goods are not included separately in gross domestic product. To do so creates the problem of double counting.

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