Google
Thursday 
February 2, 2023 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
KEOGH PLAN: A savings retirement plan for self-employed workers authorized by the Self-Employment Individuals Retirement Act (1982). A Keogh plan is similar to an IRA (individual retirement account), but is a bit more complicated to establish. Like other private pension plans, income diverted to Keogh plans are tax deferred, that is, taxes on not paid on the income until it is withdrawn during retirement.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

BANK LIABILITIES: What a bank owes, including most notably customer deposits. Bank liabilities are typically listed on the right-hand side of a bank's balance sheet. Bank assets, what a bank owns, are listed on the left-hand side of a bank's balance sheet. Net worth is the difference between assets and liabilities. The most important liability category of most bank is checkable deposits, which is part of the economy's M1 money supply. The largest liability category includes other types of deposits (especially savings deposits, certificates of deposit, and money market deposits) that enter into the M2 and M3 monetary aggregates.

     See also | bank balance sheet | bank assets | money creation | goldsmith banking | goldsmith money creation | deposit expansion multiplier | money multiplier | banks | banking | fractional-reserve banking | bank reserves | checkable deposits | savings deposits | monetary economics | liquidity | financial markets | money | Federal Reserve System | central bank | monetary policy | bank panic | bank run | monetary aggregates |


Recommended Citation:

BANK LIABILITIES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2023. [Accessed: February 2, 2023].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: bank liabilities

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

LAW OF DEMAND

The inverse relationship between demand price and the quantity demanded, assuming ceteris paribus factors are held constant. This fundamental economic principle indicates that a decrease the price of a commodity results in an increase in the quantity of the commodity that buyers are willing and able to purchase in a given period of time, if other factors are held constant. The law of demand is one of the most important principles found in the study of economics.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at an auction trying to buy either a cross-cut paper shredder or a birthday greeting card for your father. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
"We tend to forget that happiness doesn't come as a result of getting something we don't have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have."

-- Fredrick Koeing

CAF
Cost and Freight
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2023 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster