Google
Tuesday 
June 2, 2020 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
COMMAND ECONOMY: An economy in which the government uses its coercive powers (such as command and control) to answer the three questions of allocation. This is the real world version of the idealized theoretical pure command economy. While in this real world version some allocation decisions are undertaken by markets, the vast majority are made through central planning. The two most notable command economies of the 20th century were the communist/socialist economic systems of China and the Soviet Union.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

GOLDSMITH BANKING: An analysis of banking functions based on the semi-realistic activities of the goldsmith profession of Medieval Europe. Because the gold used a production inputs by goldsmiths was also used as money, they developed many modern banking functions, including maintaining deposits, making loans, keeping reserves, and creating money. While the story of goldsmith banking is often embellished for instructional purposes, it does contain the essence of how goldsmiths operated as banks.

     See also | banking | banks | fractional-reserve banking | bank reserves | traditional banks | savings and loan associations | credit unions | mutual savings banks | thrift institutions | money | M1 | profit | industry | monetary economics | government functions | financial markets | liquidity | money creation | Federal Reserve System | Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation | central bank | monetary policy | bank panic | bank run | monetary aggregates | barter |


Recommended Citation:

GOLDSMITH BANKING, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2020. [Accessed: June 2, 2020].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: goldsmith banking

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

MARGINAL PRODUCT CURVE

A curve that graphically illustrates the relation between marginal product and the quantity of the variable input, holding all other inputs fixed. This curve indicates the incremental change in output at each level of a variable input. The marginal product curve is one of three related curves used in the analysis of the short-run production of a firm. The other two are total product curve and average product curve. The marginal product curve plays in key role in the economic analysis of short-run production by a firm.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale wanting to buy either a large red and white striped beach towel or a bottle of blackcherry flavored spring water. Be on the lookout for the last item on a shelf.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The first U.S. fire insurance company was established by Benjamin Franklin in 1752 in Philadelphia.
"One worthwhile task carried to a successful conclusion is worth half-a-hundred half-finished tasks. "

-- Malcolm S. Forbes, publisher

FIML
Full Information Maximum Likelihood
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2020 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster