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ZERO-SUM GAME: A situation in which a fixed amount is divided up among the winners and losers. In a zero-sum game the wins equal the losses. Many stock market, or financial market, exchanges are zero-sum. One person buys low and sells high, while another buys high and sells low. The wealth in such transactions are merely transferred from one person to another. "Productive" market transactions, in contrast, are not zero-sum. The act of producing goods and services from resources that are consumed to satisfy wants and needs results in a net gain to society.

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GOLDSMITH BANKING: An analysis of banking functions based on the semi-realistic activities of the goldsmith profession of Medieval Europe. Because the gold used a production inputs by goldsmiths was also used as money, they developed many modern banking functions, including maintaining deposits, making loans, keeping reserves, and creating money. While the story of goldsmith banking is often embellished for instructional purposes, it does contain the essence of how goldsmiths operated as banks.

     See also | banking | banks | fractional-reserve banking | bank reserves | traditional banks | savings and loan associations | credit unions | mutual savings banks | thrift institutions | money | M1 | profit | industry | monetary economics | government functions | financial markets | liquidity | money creation | Federal Reserve System | Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation | central bank | monetary policy | bank panic | bank run | monetary aggregates | barter |


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a perfectly competitive firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a perfectly competitive firm with no market control is horizontal. The average revenue curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market trying to buy either a pair of red goulashes with shiny buckles or a handcrafted bird feeder. Be on the lookout for spoiled cheese hiding under your bed hatching conspiracies against humanity.
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Rosemary, long associated with remembrance, was worn as wreaths by students in ancient Greece during exams.
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