March 23, 2018 

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CASH: the common term for paper currency and metal coins components of the money supply. Cash includes the foldable green paper with portraits of famous dead people, and those shiny metal discs with raised imprints of famous dead people. Cash is often divided into the "cash in circulation" which is what the nonbank public uses for purchases, and "vault cash" which is what banks have stashed away in the large, highly-secured, vaults. Cash in circulation is part of the money supply. Vault cash is part of bank reserves.

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BANK RUN: A situation in which a relatively large number of a bank's customers attempt to withdraw their deposits in a relatively short period of time, usually within a day or two. While common throughout the 1800s and early 1900s, government deposit insurance has largely eliminated banks runs in the modern economy. Historically a bank run was prompted by fears that the bank was on the verge of collapse, causing deposits to become worthless. Ironically a bank run often caused the bank to fail. Bank runs were often infectious, leading to economy-wide bank panics and business-cycle contractions.

     See also | bank panic | Federal Reserve System | Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation | required reserves | banking | banks | fractional-reserve banking | bank reserves | money | monetary economics | government functions | financial markets | liquidity | money creation | central bank | monetary policy | monetary aggregates | barter | full-reserve banking | no-reserve banking | goldsmith banking |

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One of several specific aggregate expenditures determinants assumed constant when the aggregate expenditures line is constructed, and that shifts the aggregate expenditures line when it changes. An increase in inflationary expectations causes an increase (upward shift) of the aggregate expenditures line. A decrease in inflationary expectations causes a decrease (downward shift) of the aggregate expenditures line. Other notable aggregate expenditures determinants include interest rates, federal deficit, consumer confidence, and exchange rates.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club wanting to buy either a wall poster commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki or decorative garden figurines. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
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