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SAY'S LAW: A classical economic proposition stating that the production of aggregate output creates sufficient aggregate demand to purchase all of the output produced. In other words, supply creates its own demand. This is one of the three assumptions underlying the macroeconomic theory of classical economics which concluded that unrestricted market activity would generate full employment. The other two assumptions are flexible prices and saving-investment equality. Say's law is closely associated with the circular flow model.

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BANK RUN: A situation in which a relatively large number of a bank's customers attempt to withdraw their deposits in a relatively short period of time, usually within a day or two. While common throughout the 1800s and early 1900s, government deposit insurance has largely eliminated banks runs in the modern economy. Historically a bank run was prompted by fears that the bank was on the verge of collapse, causing deposits to become worthless. Ironically a bank run often caused the bank to fail. Bank runs were often infectious, leading to economy-wide bank panics and business-cycle contractions.

     See also | bank panic | Federal Reserve System | Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation | required reserves | banking | banks | fractional-reserve banking | bank reserves | money | monetary economics | government functions | financial markets | liquidity | money creation | central bank | monetary policy | monetary aggregates | barter | full-reserve banking | no-reserve banking | goldsmith banking |


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SUPPLY PRICE

The minimum price that sellers are willing and able to accept for a given quantity of a good. While sellers might be willing and able to accept more than the supply price for a given quantity, they are not willing and able to accept less. The supply curve is a plot of the supply price for each quantity.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites seeking to buy either a looseleaf notebook binder or hand lotion, a big bottle of hand lotion. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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General Electric is the only stock from the original 1896 Dow Jones Industrial Average remaining in the current index.
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