March 17, 2018 

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RESOURCE PRICES: One of the five supply determinants assumed constant when a supply curve is constructed, and that shift the supply curve when they change. The other four are technology, other prices, sellers' expectations, and number of sellers. Resource prices, the prices paid to use the factors of production (labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship) affect production cost and thus producers' ability to sell goods. In general, if sellers face higher resource prices, then they have less ABILITY to sell goods.

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DEMAND-DRIVEN BUSINESS CYCLES: Business cycle instability caused by changes in one or more of the four aggregate demand expenditures on gross domestic product--consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports. This is one of two basic types of business cycles; the other being supply-drive business cycle. Demand-driven business cycles tend to be the more common of the two types. In general, demand-driven business cycles are more responsible for short-term instability, while supply-driven business cycles tend to be more closely associated with long-run changes in the economy.

     See also | business cycle | aggregate demand | aggregate expenditures | gross domestic product | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | investment business cycle | political business cycle | stabilization policies |

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Markets or industries with two or more sellers and buyers that fail to match the criteria of perfect competition. The most noted examples of imperfect competition are the two market structures with selling-side control--monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Lesser known market structures with buying-side control--monopsonistic competition and oligopsony--are also considered as imperfect competition. Facing no competition, monopoly and monopsony are not included. Most real world markets can be considered imperfect competition.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store wanting to buy either a flower arrangement with daisies and carnations for your uncle or a coffee cup commemorating next Thursday. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
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One of the largest markets for gold in the United States is the manufacturing of class rings.
"If football taught me anything about business, it is that you win the game one play at a time."

-- Fran Tarkenton, Football Player

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