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AFC: The abbreviation for average fixed cost, which is fixed cost per unit of output, found by dividing total fixed cost by the quantity of output. Average fixed cost is one of three related cost averages. The other two are average variable cost and avarage total cost. Average fixed cost decreases with larger quantities of output. Because fixed cost is FIXED and does not change with the quantity of output, a given cost is spread more thinly per unit as quantity increases. A thousand dollars of fixed cost averages out to $10 per unit if only 100 units are produced. But if 10,000 units are produced, then the average shrinks to a mere 10 cents per unit.

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DEMAND DECREASE AND SUPPLY INCREASE: A simultaneous decrease in the willingness and ability of buyers to purchase a good at the existing price, illustrated by a leftward shift of the demand curve, and an increase in the willingness and ability of sellers to sell a good at the existing price, illustrated by a rightward shift of the supply curve. When combined, both shifts result in an indeterminant change in equilibrium quantity and a decrease in equilibrium price.

     See also | demand and supply increase | demand and supply decrease | demand increase and supply decrease | demand decrease | supply decrease | demand shock | supply shock | demand decrease | supply increase | demand determinants | supply determinants | demand curve | supply curve | comparative statics | ceteris paribus | economic analysis | graphical analysis | market equilibrium | change in demand | change in supply | price ceiling | price floor | market equilibrium, graphical analysis | aggregate market shocks |


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GROSS PRIVATE DOMESTIC INVESTMENT

This is the official item in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economics Analysis measuring capital investment expenditures. Gross private domestic investment is expenditures on capital goods to be used for productive activities in the domestic economy that are undertaken by the business sector during a given time period. These expenditures tend to be the least stable of the four expenditures, averaging between 12-18 percent of gross domestic product. This percentage tends to be at the low end during business-cycle contractions and at the high end during business-cycle expansions. The other official expenditures included in the National Income and Product Accounts are personal consumption expenditures, government consumption expenditures and gross investment, and net exports of goods and services.

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