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October 15, 2019 

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LONG-RUN MARGINAL COST: The change in the long-run total cost of producing a good or service resulting from a change in the quantity of output produced. Like all marginals, long-run marginal cost is the increment in the corresponding total. What's most notable about long-run marginal cost, however, is that we are operating in the long run. Unlike the short run, in which at least one input is fixed, there are no fixed inputs in the long run. As such, there is only variable cost. This means that long-run marginal cost is the result of changes in the cost of all inputs.

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DEMAND INCREASE AND SUPPLY DECREASE: A simultaneous increase in the willingness and ability of buyers to purchase a good at the existing price, illustrated by a rightward shift of the demand curve, and a decrease in the willingness and ability of sellers to sell a good at the existing price, illustrated by a leftward shift of the supply curve. When combined, both shifts result in an indeterminant change in equilibrium quantity and an increase in equilibrium price.

     See also | demand and supply increase | demand and supply decrease | demand decrease and supply increase | demand decrease | supply decrease | demand shock | supply shock | demand decrease | supply increase | demand determinants | supply determinants | demand curve | supply curve | comparative statics | ceteris paribus | economic analysis | graphical analysis | market equilibrium | change in demand | change in supply | price ceiling | price floor | market equilibrium, graphical analysis | aggregate market shocks |


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PRICE DISCRIMINATION

The act of selling the same good to different buyers for different prices that are not justified by different production costs. This is practiced by suppliers who have achieved some degree of market control, especially monopoly. Common examples of price discrimination are electricity rates, long-distance telephone charges, movie ticket prices, airplane ticket prices, and assorted child or senior citizen discounts. Price discrimination takes the form of one of three degrees: (1) first degree, in which each price is the maximum price that buyers are willing and able to pay, (2) second degree, in which price is based on the quantity sold, and (3) third degree, in which prices are based on an easily identifiable characteristic of the buyer.

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