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WEIGHT GAINING: An activity in which the transportation cost of the output is greater than the transportation cost of the inputs. Using the term weight to mean transportation cost, an activity is said to gain weight if the cost of moving the output to the market is greater than the cost of getting the inputs to the factory. A weight-gaining activity has a greater attraction to, and tends to locate near, the market for the output.

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DEMAND INCREASE AND SUPPLY DECREASE: A simultaneous increase in the willingness and ability of buyers to purchase a good at the existing price, illustrated by a rightward shift of the demand curve, and a decrease in the willingness and ability of sellers to sell a good at the existing price, illustrated by a leftward shift of the supply curve. When combined, both shifts result in an indeterminant change in equilibrium quantity and an increase in equilibrium price.

     See also | demand and supply increase | demand and supply decrease | demand decrease and supply increase | demand decrease | supply decrease | demand shock | supply shock | demand decrease | supply increase | demand determinants | supply determinants | demand curve | supply curve | comparative statics | ceteris paribus | economic analysis | graphical analysis | market equilibrium | change in demand | change in supply | price ceiling | price floor | market equilibrium, graphical analysis | aggregate market shocks |


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a perfectly competitive firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a perfectly competitive firm with no market control is horizontal. The average revenue curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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