March 23, 2018 

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PPF: The abbreviation for production possibilities frontier, which is a curve that illustrates the production possibilities for the economy. A production possibilities frontier represents the boundary or frontier of the economy's production capabilities. That's why it's termed a production possibilities frontier (or PPF). As a frontier, it is the maximum production possible given existing (fixed) resources and technology. Producing on the curve means resources are fully employed, while producing inside the curve means resources are unemployed. The law of increasing opportunity cost is what gives the curve its distinctive convex shape.

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AD: The abbreviation for aggregate demand, which is the total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

     See also | economy | aggregate expenditures | domestic | aggregate market analysis | price level | real production | aggregate supply | GDP price deflator | gross domestic product | real gross domestic product | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | market demand | interest-rate effect | real-balance effect | net-export effect | income effect | substitution effect |

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The consolidation of two or more separately-owned businesses, operating in separate industries, into a single firm. This is one of three types of mergers. The other two are horizontal merger--two competing firms in the same industry that sell the same products--and vertical merger--two firms in different stages of the production of one good, such that the output of one business is the input of the other.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through the yellow pages seeking to buy either a wall poster commemorating yesterday or pink cotton balls. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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Cyrus McCormick not only invented the reaper for harvesting grain, he also invented the installment payment for selling his reaper.
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