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CAVEAT EMPTOR: A handy little latin term meaning to "let the buyer beware." It's a warning to buyers that sellers will try to extract a high price for low-quality stuff, and a heed that every hardworking consumer of the third estate should take. If you find you've been "taken", note that government has established consumer protection guidelines that businesses are legally compelled to follow. As such, you can seek action through the Federal Trade Commission, Consumer Product Safety Commission, your state attorney general, and in all likelihood your local police department.

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AD: The abbreviation for aggregate demand, which is the total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

     See also | economy | aggregate expenditures | domestic | aggregate market analysis | price level | real production | aggregate supply | GDP price deflator | gross domestic product | real gross domestic product | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | market demand | interest-rate effect | real-balance effect | net-export effect | income effect | substitution effect |


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AD, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: May 22, 2024].


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) and the level of aggregate income or production. In Keynesian economics, the aggregate expenditures line is the essential component of the Keynesian cross analysis used to identify equilibrium income and production. Like any straight line, the aggregate expenditures line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous expenditures, and slope, which indicates induced expenditures. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking investment, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale looking to buy either a how-to book on the art of negotiation or a flower arrangement for your aunt. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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Much of the $15 million used by the United States to finance the Louisiana Purchase from France was borrowed from European banks.
"There is no passion to be found playing small in settling for a life that idles than the one you are capable of living."

-- Nelson Mandela

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