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TOTAL REVENUE, MONOPOLY: The revenue received by a monopoly firm for the sale of its output. Total revenue is one of two parts a monopoly needs for the calculation of economic profit, the other is total cost. In general, total revenue is the price received for selling a good times the quantity of the good sold at that price. Because a monopoly completely controls its market and faces a negatively-sloped demand curve, it charges a different price for a given quantity. If a monopoly sells a relatively small quantity, it charges a relatively high price. If it sells a relatively smaller quantity, it charges a relatively lower price. However, once the monopoly determines its' price/quantity combination, total revenue calculation is relatively straightforward, multiply the price times the quantity.

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AD: The abbreviation for aggregate demand, which is the total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

     See also | economy | aggregate expenditures | domestic | aggregate market analysis | price level | real production | aggregate supply | GDP price deflator | gross domestic product | real gross domestic product | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | market demand | interest-rate effect | real-balance effect | net-export effect | income effect | substitution effect |


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LONG-RUN TOTAL COST

The opportunity cost incurred by all of the factors of production used in the long run (when all inputs are variable) by a firm to produce a good or service, including wages paid to labor, rent paid for the land, interest paid to capital owners, and a normal profit earned by entrepreneurs. Unlike short-run total cost, long-run total cost cannot be separated into fixed cost and variable cost. In the long run, all inputs are variable, so all cost is variable.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers wanting to buy either a lazy Susan for you dining room table or a set of serrated steak knives, with durable plastic handles. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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The first paper currency used in North America was pasteboard playing cards "temporarily" authorized as money by the colonial governor of French Canada, awaiting "real money" from France.
"If things are not going well with you, begin your effort at correcting the situation by carefully examining the service you are rendering, and especially the spirit in which you are rendering it."

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