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July 19, 2018 

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LONG-RUN EQUILIBRIUM: The condition that exists for the aggregate market when the product, financial, and resource markets are in equilibrium simultaneously. This condition is made possible by flexible wages and prices and is represented by the intersection of the AD (aggregate demand) curve and the LRAS (long-run aggregate supply) curve.

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KEYNESIAN MODEL: A macroeconomic model based on the principles of Keynesian economics that is used to identify the equilibrium level of, and analyze disruptions to, aggregate production and income. This model identifies equilibrium aggregate production and income as the intersection of the aggregate expenditures line and the 45-degree line. The Keynesian model comes in three basic variations designated by the number of macroeconomic sectors included--two-sector, three-sector, and four sector. The Keynesian model is also commonly presented in the form of injections and leakages in addition to the standard aggregate expenditures format. This model is used to analyze several important topics and issues, including multipliers, business cycles, fiscal policy, and monetary policy.

     See also | Keynesian equilibrium | two-sector Keynesian model | three-sector Keynesian model | four-sector Keynesian model | Keynesian disequilibrium | recessionary gap, Keynesian model | inflationary gap, Keynesian model | injections-leakages model | multiplier | fiscal policy | Keynesian economics | Keynesian cross | aggregate expenditures | aggregate expenditures line | effective demand | induced expenditures | autonomous expenditures | macroeconomics | macroeconomic sectors | expansionary fiscal policy | contractionary fiscal policy | automatic stabilizers | injections | leakages | Keynesian cross and aggregate market | expenditures multiplier | accelerator principle | paradox of thrift | aggregate market analysis | business cycles |


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PRICE TAKER

A buyer or seller that has no market control and is not able to affect the price of a good. It must "take" or accept the going market price. The market structure that exemplifies price taker is perfect competition. In fact, perfect competition is the only example of price taker. This is one of two alternatives related to control over price. The other is price maker. Price taker is also termed price seeker.

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The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
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