Google
Sunday 
April 22, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
EURO: The denomination of the so-called single currency that is designed to integrate economic and monetary policies for the European Union. The euro will contain paper currency (banknotes) and metal coins and will replace the European Currency Unit that is presently used for commercial and financial transactions. While that plans are to introduce this single currency with paper and coins in 2002, no one knows for sure if the euro will completely replace national currencies (British pound, French franc, etc.) for transactions within each nation. The paper currency will come in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 500 euros and the metal coins will come in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents, as well as 1 euro and 2 euros.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

KEYNESIAN DISEQUILIBRIUM: The state of the Keynesian model in which aggregate expenditures are not equal to aggregate production, which results in an imbalance that induces a change in aggregate production. In other words, the opposing forces of aggregate expenditures (the buyers) and aggregate production (the sellers) are out of balance. At the existing level of aggregate production, either the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) are unable to purchase all of the production that they seek or producers are unable to sell all of the production that they have.

     See also | Keynesian model | Keynesian equilibrium | two-sector Keynesian model | three-sector Keynesian model | four-sector Keynesian model | recessionary gap, Keynesian model | inflationary gap, Keynesian model | injections-leakages model | multiplier | fiscal policy | equilibrium | market disequilibrium | Keynesian economics | Keynesian cross | aggregate expenditures | aggregate expenditures line | 45-degree line | gross domestic product | macroeconomic sectors | macroeconomic markets | change in private inventories | expansionary fiscal policy | contractionary fiscal policy | automatic stabilizers | injections | leakages | Keynesian cross and aggregate market | expenditures multiplier | accelerator principle | paradox of thrift | aggregate market analysis | business cycles | disequilibrium, aggregate market |


Recommended Citation:

KEYNESIAN DISEQUILIBRIUM, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 22, 2018].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: Keynesian disequilibrium

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES DETERMINANTS

Ceteris paribus factors, other than aggregate income or production, that are held constant when the aggregate expenditures line is constructed and which cause the aggregate expenditures line to shift when they change. Some of the more important aggregate expenditures determinants are interest rates, expectations, fiscal policy, wealth, and exchange rates.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching the newspaper want ads trying to buy either income tax software or a how-to book on the art of negotiation. Be on the lookout for infected paper cuts.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The New York Stock Exchange was established by a group of investors in New York City in 1817 under a buttonwood tree at the end of a little road named Wall Street.
"The vacuum created by failure to communicate will quickly be filled with rumor, misrepresentations, drivel and poison. "

-- C. Northcote Parkinson, historian

EOE
European Options Exchange
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster